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CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Reversing His Medical Marijuana Stance – Script

Joe Rogan

I wanted to have you on first of all because I really respected that you made this change of opinion publicly when you were first talking about marijuana. You were talking about it as if it had no medical benefit and it was really just a recreational drug that was possibly or probably harmful – is that a assessment that you agree with?

Sanjay Gupta

Yeah, I think it certainly didn’t seem to have any medicinal benefit.

Joe Rogan

Right, yeah. But then upon further examination you publicly changed your position and and you in doing so you actually examined all the scientific evidence that pointed to, for many people with diseases, many people that are on chemotherapy, many people with uh you know, some serious ailments, marijuana can be very beneficial and you talked about that and I really admired that. Because that takes a lot of courage because a lot of people when they uh have an idea and they proclaim it publicly they double down and they just you know, use confirmation bias and whatever you know, echo chamber news sources they can get to sort of confirm their initial position and you didn’t do that and I thought that’s a real, a real thinking person who is trying to honestly figure out what’s going on instead of just working on being right.

Sanjay Gupta

Well I look I appreciate that and I have been very it was very illuminating for me because I think the way that we become a more knowledgeable society I think sometimes surprises people um I do think, and maybe this will dovetail even to a little bit of what’s going on now, but the thing is that when you look at the, so if you were just to look at the bulk of evidence around cannabis at that, and I’m talking I wrote this Time magazine article back you know this is probably 12,13 years ago, and I looked at the bulk of evidence and you say okay I’m going to look at the 400 most recent papers, I’m going to read the abstracts I’m gonna dig in deep on some of them and 94% of them were basically the hypothesis was, where’s the harm here. Show me the harm, right. The hypothesis was not show me the benefit, that was only true for about 6%. So right away you’re dealing with a sort of very biased sort of set of data and that’s one stream up. Now if you’re just looking at papers like well this one potentially long harm, this one possible addiction, this one gateway you know – you’re seeing all those individual studies. But at a broader level, one step upstream, you realize that most of the studies that are getting funded are designed to look for harm right. So when I saw that that was the first time I thought why, why are the studies that are getting out there why are they all designed to look for harm? Then I started looking in other countries and some really good research out of places like Israel in particular, a guy names Raf Mushulum who’s 91 years old now, he’s the first guy to ever isolate thc and then synthesize it. He’s been doing this work forever – he may get the nobel prize before he dies for for his work in this. They were talking about the use of cannabis for all sorts of ailments including refractory seizures in kids. And that one really that really got to me for a couple of reasons. One is that I think when you’re trying to do studies on things like pain, it’s it’s hard it’s a subjective thing right and so you think is how do you how do you really have conclusive proof that this is working the way that you think it is. Someone says their pain is better and that’s important, but how do you measure that. A little child who’s having 300 seizures a week and is now not having seizures is a much more specific sort of metric. And it seemed to work really well in kids who did not respond to existing seizure drugs, which was kind of amazing to me. And I think I told you when we’ve spoken before that that to me in some ways that wasn’t just a medical issue at that point, it was a moral issue because nothing worked for these kids. And they were even thinking about even compounding veterinary medications for them and these parents are like you know in their kitchen sinks stirring up you know, cannabis trying to get the formulation right to turn it into an oil or a tincture they could put underneath the kids tongue and it was working and you know I did stories on these kids and they were emblematic of thousands of more kids these weren’t just anecdotal stories. And that’s when I said you know, there’s something here. But I gotta tell you um when I wrote the article saying I changed my mind on this you know, you know you hit send at night and you wake up in the morning and I work at a university, I’m a I’m a practicing physician you know I live in that world and part of me did wonder like what is the response going to be – I felt very comfortable with what I had written. What I did not know was how it would be received. And that that’s always a challenge I think.

Joe Rogan

How was it received?

Sanjay Gupta

I think, well I’m still employed so that part of it was good. You know I don’t know if my chairman would say hey look you know uh I may agree or not agree with you that’s beside the point you shouldn’t have done this or whatever. I, I you know I had no idea how they were going to respond. I think it was received well Joe, I think that um it added to the knowledge tree of how we advance as a society.

Joe Rogan

It’s a sign of the time I think. I think if you had done that a couple of decades ago maybe there have been a lot more pushback. I think people are coming to a uh much more of an understanding and and also the logical aspect of it like when people look at all the things that human beings are allowed to consume, including this uh thing you gave me here this looks it’s pretty spectacular.

Sanjay Gupta

I’m pretty proud of my gift that I’ve given you here.

 Joe Rogan

Some serious bourbon here, thank you for that.

Sanjay Gupta

Well for that man who has everything…

 Joe Rogan

This is um legal you know I mean we can enjoy a glass, it’s normal it’s it’s a normal thing. And we all agree to that it’s a you know, it’s a long-standing tradition for people to drink alcohol socially. Marijuana for whatever reasons and we could go into that if you want but it’s been demonized unfairly and people know that. It’s not like heroin or crack or things that you’ve seen people’s lives fall apart on it on a regular basis. And I think most people are aware of that now. So in the era that you publish that, it’s people have come to an understanding that it’s not, it’s not one of the hard drugs, it’s not the most dangerous thing in the world, it’s not good for kids, it’s not good for some people it’s not good for some people maybe with uh possible schizophrenic tendencies. I think there’s a real concern there and uh…

 Sanjay Gupta

I mean yeah I you know It’s it’s you raise a really important point you know one thing I tried to stay away from whenever I wrote about this was, I felt like was a little bit of a trap to get into the moral equivalency of things. Like I think things should just stand on their own two feet you know, well it’s better than this! Right. What you’re saying is true I feel like alcohol can be a sledgehammer to the brain I really do. If you think about the way alcohol effects the brain very different than the way cannabis affects the brain. Um and that part of it is true but the idea that it could be a medicine in particular, I mean you know, I thnk that that is really quite striking and it’s a plant you know and there’s all these things and I listen like I said I listen to your podcast I listen to Brett and I listen to others and I get the points that they’re making about that in terms of can you look to the earth to heal and often times you can you know we’ve been given a lot of things but I think that with with cannabis in particular the the evidence… I’m not the first to say this obviously people have been saying this for a long time, maybe the timing was right but two decades ago people were saying this three decades ago people were saying this this was on the formulary in the United States in the 1940’s, post reefer madness which I think was like 1936 or something like that. People were already saying hey wait a second, this could be used to treat addiction, this could be used to treat you know even parkinsonian-like symptoms. There was all these things that they were putting out there and then it went through this cultural sort of assassination for a while which was which was wild to sort of reflect on historically.

The End

Taken from: JRE #1718 w/Dr. Sanjay Gupta

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Joe on Tyson Fury vs. Deontay Wilder 3 – Script

Joe Rogan

Did you see the fight?

Redban

No, no.

Joe Rogan

Oh my god dude, he’s one of the greatest heavyweight fighters of all time. One of the greatest boxing matches of all time. Have you seen it yet Jamie? We can’t hear ya.

Young Jamie

Yes yes I watched it live.

Joe Rogan

Yeah.

Young Jamie

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

Did you sh*t your pants?

Young Jamie

Uhhh no I was tired, long day so I was just sort of watching it.

 Joe Rogan

Did you scream out at all?

Young Jamie

No.

 Joe Rogan

You don’t scream out at things still do you?

 Young Jamie

I will on occasion but I like have to be real riled up.

Tony Hinchcliffe

Buckeye stuff right.

Young Jamie

Uh it depends really, I’ll be honest I’m trying to think the last time I did…

Redban

Actually something happened… I scream on occasions when Kanye and Kim got divorced.

Joe Rogan

{Laughs} When Kim showed up with that crazy mask on, nooooooo. Dude, that fight had us screaming, we were screaming. We had an awesome watching party because it was uh it was Phil, it was uh Lara Beitz and it was uh Tony and I…

Tony Hinchcliffe

Jimmy Batulo!

Joe Rogan

Yeah…

Tony Hinchcliffe

Joe Marsco!

Joe Rogan

All these friends of Tony’s and Tony’s family and, it was fu**ing amazing. It was a it was a, you know there’s something about watching fights with a bunch of people it’s very festive you know, when everyone’s screaming and cheering on it’s like it’s more exciting. It’s like you got a small crowd, it’s almost like you’re watching it live when you are watching it live but you’re almost like watching it in a small crowd.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Yeah and it was cool because like we’d go to a lot of cities on a lot of different nights there’s never a boxing match like that like we don’t ever really do a viewing party like that but it was so fitting that we were to me, that we were an hour away from Youngstown which is like a real boxing city. You know, boom boom and Kelly Pavlik and all those greats, uh that came out of there.

Joe Rogan

Well it’s just to be able to watch that fight live and catch it live because it was so good. It was so crazy, it was so action-filled, I mean it was fu**ing amazing. From Tyson Fury knocking Wilder down early to Wilder looking like he was done with his right hand boooom! He had Tyson Fury on Queer Street. Look at how that punch…

 Redban

Queer street? {chuckles}

 Joe Rogan

Look at how that… that’s what they call it, because you don’t know what’s going on, it’s odd it’s a word for odd. It’s an old saying it’s nothing to do with gay folks. Look at this boom, look at this punch, look at the fat, watch his fat ripple.

Redban

Oh wow.

 Joe Rogan

Look at that ripple all the way down. Bro, that’s how hard Deontay Wilder punches. Let me see that again. Because that is, there’s maybe one or two other humans that have ever lived that could punch as hard as this guy. He’s without a doubt one of the hardest punchers of all time. So he smashes Tyson Fury, while he’s getting his ass kicked, smashes him with his right hand the 4th round – look at that fat roll down, look at that fat look at it roll down! I mean that’s the shock waves that ripple through his head. Most human beings right there are going out, most human beings. And then he hits him again and clubs him to the ground there – he hit him behind the ear. He’s a murderous puncher but the, the level of skill was so evident, the difference is Tyson Fury is a masterful boxer I mean he’s masterful. The sh*t that he did was amazing and his strategy was amazing. Just stay glued to Deontay, wear on him, hang on him, make him work and just just drag him deeper and deeper into these fu**ing horrible waters filled with crocodiles, that’s what he did and almost got knocked out doing it. That’s how dangerous Wilder is. Wilder is like the opposite of Usyk, like Usyk is like this insane boxer who’s like this insane footwork and motion and Wilder kind of looks awkward at times. But if he hits you once you’re fu**ed. Even if you are one of the greatest boxers of all time like Tyson Fury – he’s without a doubt one of the greatest heavyweight boxers ever. 6 foot 9, 277 pounds and lightning fast for a guy that big, he moves so well. He moves his jabs incredible.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

I mean isn’t it crazy destiny, what are the odds that that guy could be Paul Jenkins or Mike Smith just as easily his name is Tyson Fury, a heavyweight god! His name Tyson Fury, what are the odds of that?

Joe Rogan

It’s amazing.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Like Mike Tyson, one of the GOATS. Fury, six nine, crazy.

Joe Rogan

Greatest name of all time.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Yeah. That’s like a great comedian literally his parents name him like funny pants smith or something.

 Redban

Joe King?

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Yeah, hey we know a Joe King.

Joe Rogan

Well his whole family was into fighting like he was learning how to box from the time he was small, small boy. Like he’s always known how to box. Deontay Wilder didn’t even take up boxing until he was 19. And Deontay Wilder won a bronze medal in the Olympic games a year and a half after boxing. He’s a special talent, just just insane power. But the difference in the level of understanding of where to be, where not to be, how to move, how to faint and how to draw reactions and set traps, the difference is out of this world. But Deontay hit’s so hard it almost didn’t matter, it almost didn’t matter that Tyson Fury was so much more skillful and so much slicker with so much more experience. Tyson Fury hits so fu**ing hard that it almost didn’t matter. 

 Tony Hinchcliffe

My dad’s girlfriend had her head in her hands after that round where Fury got knocked down twice. She just like was, she felt bad for this guy that was getting beat up on. And I touched her shoulder and I go that guy’s gonna come back and win this fight and she goes, really?

Joe Rogan

You might have been wrong.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

I could have easily been wrong but…

Joe Rogan

Now you’re talking sh*t.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

No, I know what the hell’s going on.

 Joe Rogan

You didn’t know jack sh*t, no one knew jack sh*t in that fight. When he got dropped we all thought it was over. I was like oh my god he’s fu**ed because he got hit hard! You could tell like when he got up he was not really there and then he got clubbed in the back of the head and fell down again – or behind the ear – and fell down again I was like oh my god, but then he came back. He did come back. The craziest comeback ever was him in the 12th round of the first fight, that was the craziest. That’s nuts, that didn’t even make sense. But there was some controversy about this fight. And one of the controversies was the extremely long counts when uh Tyson Fury went down. {Joe reads from an article} Cormier believes Fury benefited from crazy slow count, that’s right, after being knocked down by Wilder. Daniel Cormier believes the referee made a bad call in the fourth round uh Fury versus Wilder 3. Well he’s correct, this is what happened. The count is supposed to the referee is supposed to go one, two when the guy goes down. But if for any reason he has to interrupt the count because like they’re like, another, the fighter the the opponent needs to be told to go to the neutral corner, you’re supposed to pick up the count where the ringside counter has it so there’s a guy who’s counting ringside, and he’ll keep the count going so if you’re at one, two and then you’re like go to a neutral corner, that guy’s supposed to be like three, four, five…

 Redban

As it should.

Joe Rogan

But he didn’t, he went back to it three, four.. but the guy had already been down for a couple of seconds, without a doubt it was a long count.

 Redban

That’s bullsh*t. That’s the problem with boxing though that’s what people have a problem with. That’s like considered kind of like bullsh*t.

 Joe Rogan

It’s one of two things it’s either a mistake and the guy made an error, or maybe there’s a I don’t think I don’t think those, there’s a different law in Vegas. I don’t think the law, I don’t think there’s a rule that allows them to do that I think it’s an error. Or corruption. Most likely an error. Most likely the guy’s panicking he’s in this huge fight, I don’t know how many big high-profile fights, I’m not that well schooled on uh boxing referees. I know a few of them, I used to know more of them back in the day but I know a few of them. I didn’t I haven’t I don’t know if I’ve seen that guy work before. So I don’t know if he’s panicking but boxing got a lot of uh…

Redban

There should be someone overseeing him though that goes hey you can’t do that.

 Joe Rogan

Exactly. There should be a thing that’s like loud as a guy goes down. Here’s my take on it, it shouldn’t be up to the referee to count, it shouldn’t be he can go one, two, three. Or you can go onnnnneeee, twooooo it shouldn’t be that there should be a count, there should be 10 seconds and there should be like an LCD screen and when a guy goes down it starts at ten. And when he you know when it gets to or it starts at one or zero whatever…

Tony Hinchcliffe

I feel like Japanese or Chinese they do that right? Something like that I feel like I’ve seen that before.

 Joe Rogan

In what in boxing?

 Tony Hinchcliffe

I think, I feel like it’s a different thing it’s like a loud over the ‘one’ but it’s like Chinese words or whatever.

Joe Rogan

Well I know they’ve done that on some boxing telecasts where you hear the ringside count I know that for a fact. And I know guys have picked it up at certain like picked it up at five, six. But in this case, there was without a doubt like a gap where he was directing some stuff inside the ring and then he came back and picked up the count – so it was definitely long. The question is could Fury haven gotten up. Maybe, but could he have gotten up two seconds earlier, three seconds earlier whatever the extra count was and could Wilder have jumped on him and hurt him again. Yeah, that’s possible too. You don’t know, when a guy gets that hurt if you give him any extra time that’s a bonus. Any three seconds, four seconds that makes a big difference. That’s between the world spinning and all of a sudden the world’s not spinning anymore.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Well I noticed that ref kept doing that put your gloves up, now walk towards me with your gloves up. And then he would wipe the gloves like he did it each for.. at least he kept it sort of consistent but…

Joe Rogan

That’s standard, that’s standard because you’ve gotta find out if a guy, if a guy goes down and then you go put your gloves up, walk towards me and he walks towards you and he’s like starts stumbling, stop the fight. Because you don’t know, it’s just it’s just guess work. And it’s all subjective right. One referee will stop a fight when a guy is getting fu**ed up and another referee will let it go. There’s a lot of referees who would have stopped this fight earlier. There’s quite a few referees where when Tyson Fury was battering Deontay Wilder they would have stopped the fight. You know and this was uh Wilder’s argument about the first fight or the second fight when he did get stopped. He felt like he could have kept going. Judging by this fight, he probably is correct he probably could have kept going but he might have gotten knocked out there. But he could have kept going like in this fight it looked like in that one round, I think it was in the second, where Tyson Fury dropped Deontay Wilder and he barely survived and he made it to the end bell, what if that was the beginning of the round? You know, what if what if you know who knows it’s it’s you never know. So could he have gone on from the second fight when they stopped the fight? Probably. You know maybe it was like for his health that his uh corner threw the towel in and stopped the fight, maybe they know him and they know how tough he is that’s what you see in this fight. You see how fu**ing tough he is, how much pain and how much punishment he endured and still was dangerous, still hurt Fury and still hurt him again after that right. He hurt him one other time later didn’t drop him but hurt him. So he hurt him on a few occasions. But when he went out man he went out bad. He went out, that’s a bad knockout. That was a bad.. and Tyson Fury said it best he goes that’s the kind of knockout that can end a career. I mean it might not but that was a bad knockout. Show the knockout, he wings a left hook, misses it and steps in with a right hand that just spins his head around. It was Crazy.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

Yeah, hitting the mat like woke him up he was out on his way down.

 Joe Rogan

Yeah. And when we were watching it we were like this is the greatest fight I’ve ever seen in my life.

Tony Hinchcliffe

Yeah. So fun.

 Joe Rogan

The thing is it’s like does he come back from that? Like he’s 35 I think his trainer said he doesn’t want him to even think about it he just wants him to do nothing but rest – don’t even think about boxing just take a rest you earned it like let’s just like, don’t get all anxious and ramp up for the rematch – because that’s what he did for this fight apparently. When he got beaten in the second fight and he felt like there was all sorts of controversy attached to it, it got real ugly with the accusations. Like he accused all but accused his trainer being involved in it, it was his trainer was Mark Breland. Let’s watch this again, look at this watch the end. The left here’s the right, Boom! I mean, bro that is crazy. That is a crazy knockout. And in a fight, look at that one more time let’s see it again. He hits him with a right hand he know’s he’s got him hurt lets him go, left hand here’s the left misses with the left then boom. He clipped him with the left too but the right was perfect. Fu** what a fight. When it was over we were like holy sh*t what a rollercoaster ride. One of the most exciting boxing matches of all time for sure.

Tony Hinchcliffe

Hell yeah. Crazy that a guy six nine going up against a guy six six like…

 Joe Rogan

Six seven.

 Tony Hinchcliffe

True heavyweight yeah crazy, true heavyweight fight.

Joe Rogan

The other thing was Deontay Wilder was 238 for that fight which was the heaviest of his career, he was 209 for their first fight. Yeah, and it’s like you know, is that good? Was it good to put all that extra weight on like maybe. Maybe it helped him fight him off, maybe it hindered his movement. If you could teach Deontay Wilder footwork like real footwork how to bounce and move and slide in slide out and not be awkward at all, to be slick, god with that punch. It’s almost like the punches it’s almost like it hinders a fighter in a certain way to have that kind of power. Because you know all you have to do is hit a guy so all you’re thinking about doing is hitting him. And it worked 41 times like he’s knocked out 41 guys or 40. I think he’s like 41, yeah he had one decision out of his 41 victories which is crazy, that’s the craziest record in the history of the sport. There’s not a single guy that’s knocked out as many guys as Deontay Wilder has. If you could teach that guy how to move like Tyson Fury does if you could teach that guy how to pretend he doesn’t have any power. Like just really develop real boxing skills and just almost pretend you can’t break an egg, just be in the right position always and just touch people just touch because he hits so fu**ing hard man. But people that have that kind of power for whatever reason they always, not always but a lot of times they rely on it because it’s so extraordinary they just know that all they have to do is land that one shot. The guys who are like the masterful boxers they never have that like the Julio Cesar Chaves’ of the worlds, he’s one of the most masterful boxers ever. But he never was like a one punch guy he would break guys down, he would very rarely stop someone with one punch in the first round. Most of the fights was just him just beating the sh*t out of people like super technically and he would just move in and throw shots and every shot that was coming your way was accurate and eventually he’s break fighters down and smash them. But if you could get a guy like Deontay Wilder to pretend he doesn’t have power and to learn how to box like Julio Cesar Chaves, he’s definitely one of the greatest fighters of all time.

The End

Taken from: JRE #1720 w/Tony Hinchcliffe & Redban

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Joe on Nick Diaz’s Return – Script

PowerfulJRE Script

Joe Rogan

He was on of uh Nick’s training partner’s, he’s been a training partner of Nick’s forever.

Bert Kreischer

Nick?

Joe Rogan

Nick Diaz.

Bert Kreischer

That guy…

Joe Rogan

Joe Schiling

Bert Kreischer

Oh my god I thought you meant the guy that got knocked out I was like wait, what the fu*k.

Joe Rogan

Oh no way no, no, no Joe Schiling.

 Bert Kreischer

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

He was there at the Diaz fight and um, my thing about Nick Diaz is like when I looked at him physically I was like I don’t know how much he’s been training. Like when nick was in his prime he was like really lean and he was you know I mean he’s definitely like an older guy now and…

 Bert Kreischer

How old though?

 Joe Rogan

I think he’s like 30.. I don’t know how old…

Young Jamie

38.

Joe Rogan

38.

 Bert Kreischer

          Is he really?

Joe Rogan

Yeah. But the thing is like I don’t think you can just jump back in that easy after 6 years out of the sport. I think you’d probably need more time to prepare. I don’t know…

 Bert Kreischer

He kind of got fuc*ed right?

Joe Rogan

Well I don’t know how much time he had to prepare and why they agreed to do a fight on short notice – I think it was only like 6 weeks notice which I think is fine if you are you know, Michael Chandler, if you’re in like peak form right now and you’re ready to go and someone gives you 6 weeks I bet you can get ready for a fight. But if you’re a guy who’s been off for that long you’re gonna need more time I think. Im just guessing, I don’t know how much time it took him but my point was he didn’t do that bad for a guy that was out 6 months.

 Bert Kreischer

Yehah.

Joe Rogan

You know, Robbie Lawler ws pressuring him and he was putting it on him and he was definitely getting the better of the exchanges. But, it’s not like Nick Diaz didn’t have his moments and he definitely did. He would just have to have really like way more time to prepare and he would have to really be like ready to go. Like the old Nick Diaz like the Nick Diaz that fought Anderson Silva, like the Nick Diaz that fought George St Pierre, like the Nick Diaz that fought Paul Daley in Strikeforce. I mean that dude was a fu*king killer. It was like, can he still do that at 38, well maybe, we don’t know if you just have one fight you need time like if your body hasn’t been used to this stuff and you haven’t been training as much as you were when you’re in your prime, if you still wanna do it again like legitimately, physcially you probably can. But it’s like you know you’ve run a marathon, when you start out and you run a mile and you’re dead and you’re like I can’t believe anybody could run 26 of those. But if you do it over and over and  over again you build up. I don’t think he had a chance, I dont think Nick Diaz had a chance to build back up after being off for that much time, I think you get back to where he was Nick Diaz in his best. You gotta like, he’s got to have some time.

 Bert Kreischer

Those Diaz brothers were great their fu*king their pace. They could last the whole fu*king fight because their cardio.

Joe Rogan

Well it’s there, they’re always in the triathlons and sh*t. They got Kron Gracie into that too.

 Bert Kreischer

Really?

Joe Rogan

Yeah it’s one of the reasons why he’s so good is his cardio is amazing too.

 Bert Kreischer

I did a triathlon, most terrifying thing i’ve ever done in my life.

Joe Rogan

Oh my god man.

 Bert Kreischer

          I’m running the New York City marathon.

Joe Rogan

When’s that?

 Bert Kreischer

November 6th.

Joe Rogan

How are you doing that like this?

 Bert Kreischer

I don’t know Joe.

Joe Rogan

What the fu*k you doing…

 Bert Kreischer

          I don’t know you saw Nick, you saw Nick up into the cage i’ll figure, i’ll figure it out – Robbie Lawler won’t be there.

Joe Rogan

Why would you just uh, make yourself smaller first?

 Bert Kreischer

          I don’t know we should do another cocktail. I’m gonna try to lose weight, I’m gonna try to lose weight.

The End

Taken from: JRE #1712 w/Bert Kreischer

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Scripts

Anna Lembke on What Happens in the Brain During Addiction – Script

PowerfulJRE SCRIPT

Anna Lembke

It’s something that people used to call the addictive personality. We don’t really call It that anymore we just use the idea of the disease model. So, we say that somebody has the disease of addiction, it’s a chronic relapsing and remitting problem. People come to it with different degrees of vulnerability and the risk for it can essentially be summarized as nature, nurture and neighborhood. And just to briefly describe that, if you have a biological parent or grandparent with addiction you are at increased risk compared to the general population of getting addicted yourself if you have a co-occurring mental illness, you are at increased risk of getting addicted if you have certain character traits like you’re more impulsive – you have a hard time putting a break between the idea to do something and actually doing it. You are at increased risk for addiction so that’s kind of all in the sort of nature risk category. There’s also the nurture piece of it so if you grow up in an environment where you experience a whole lot a trauma, you are at increased risk for becoming addicted. If you grew up in an environment where your caretakers model uhm using drugs and alcohol or other addictive substances or behaviors as a coping strategy, you are an increased risk of becoming addicted or even if they just implicitly condone it and then that brings us to the whole neighborhood idea. And this I think is a really under-recognized aspect of our risk for addiction which is just simple access so if you live in an environment where you have more access to highly reinforcing drugs and behaviors, you’re more likely to try them and just simply in being exposed, especially with the increasing potency, variety and novelty of drugs today, your increased risk of becoming addicted. So if you go see a doctor who’s more free with their prescription pad you’re exposed to opioids or Benzo’s you’re more likely to get addicted – if you grow up in a culture where people are playing a lot of video games you’re more likely to try them, more likely to get addicted. So this nature, nurture and neighborhood are the risk factors but again, people bring different degrees of vulnerability to this problem of addiction and some people are more vulnerable than others – and you may indeed be in that category where you’re just some, somebody who you know, once you find something that’s reinforcing for you you just go “vhrum!” and you just want to do it again and again.

Joe Rogan

When you say reinforcing, what do you mean by that?

Anna Lembke

I mean that it’s rewarding in some way.

Joe Rogan

Rewarding?

Anna Lembke

Rewarding, right. So it’s it’s, it’s pleasurable at first. Now the thing about addiction and the way that it changes our brains is that thing that initially is pleasurable and has us engaging in approach behaviors. If we continue to consume that substance or engage in that behavior it ultimately actually puts us in a dopamine deficit state – such that we want to continue to do that behavior, not to feel good but just to stop feeling bad. And that’s kind of one of the fundamental things about the disease of addiction it’s innate vulnerability to start, added to the changes that occur in the brain as a result of ongoing consumption of our drug. And those brain changes are what drive continued compulsive use.

Joe Rogan

So that’s the difference between being enthusiastic about something, that you enjoy versus something that consumes your life – so you’re kind of chasing the dragon like the initial fir.. like that’s what they talk about it with heroin addiction..

Anna Lembke

Right.

Joe Rogan

Don’t they say chasing the dragon?

 Anna Lembke

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

The initial rush that you get from the first um uses of it you’re always chasing that but really what you’re doing later on in life is just trying to no be sick.

 Anna Lembke

Yes.

 Joe Rogan

Not having it in your body makes you feel terrible.

 Anna Lembke

Right so, so interesting that that term chasing the dragon it comes in part from as you describe like the elusiveness of trying to recreate that initial high – which with continued use becomes harder and harder. But it also literally comes from when heroin is inhaled. So if you put it on a piece of tin foil and you light it underneath you get this kind of smoke, then that plume looks like a dragon’s tail…

Joe Rogan

Ohhhh.

Anna Lembke

So it’s got a couple of different meanings. But yes um I mean what you’re saying is exactly right and the way that I describe this to patients and describe it to medical students is imaging that in your brain there’s a balance, um kind of like a teeter-totter in a kid’s playground, and one of the most interesting findings in neuroscience in the past 75 years is that pleasure and pain are co-located. Which means the same parts of our brain that process pleasure also process pain and they work like opposite side of a balance so when we do something that’s rewarding or reinforcing or pleasurable, our balance slips slightly to the side of pleasure – we get a little release of dopamine. The pleasure neurotransmitter in that part of our brain our reward pathway and we feel good. But the thing about that balance is that it wants to remain level and the brain will work very hard to restore a level balance or what’s called homeostasis. And it does that by tipping the brain an equal and opposite amount to the side of pain. So again, the way the balance restores homeostasis is to tip to the opposite side – that’s the come down after using that moment of wanting to do it again, the hangover. If we wait long enough that feeling passes and balance is restored. But if we don’t wait and we continue to use our drug again and again, we end up with a balance that’s essentially weighted to the side of pain. And I imagine that like these little neural adaptation gremlins hopping on the pain side of the balance – it’s not very scientific I know. But the point is that with repeated use we get enough gremlins on the pain side of the balance to fill this whole room and then we’re essentially working from a dopamine deficit state, we’ve down regulated our own dopamine, we’ve down regulated our own dopamine transmission and those gremlins like it on the balance so they don’t get off after the hangover is over, or the acute withdrawal, they can persist there for weeks to months to years. Which is why people with addiction, even when their lives have become so much better, will relapse because they’re not walking around with a level pleasure, pain balance, they’re walking around with a balanced tipped to the side of pain, they’re experiencing the universal symptoms of withdrawal from any addictive substance or behavior, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, dysphoria and intrusive thoughts of wanting to use their drug again. Now with enough time elapsed and again with people in people with severe addiction it can take months to years, those neuro-adaptation gremlins will hop off, we will regenerate our own dopamine and our own dopamine receptors and and our level balance or homeostasis will be restored.

 Joe Rogan

Is it scientific to call them gremlins?

Anna Lembke

Super scientific!

{Both laugh}

The End

Taken from: JRE #1707 w/Anna Lembke

Categories
Scripts

The Time Billy Corben Met Janet Jackson Script

PowerfulJRE SCRIPT

Billy Corben

It’s kind of the fun thing about this business like, the entertainment is like you know you don’t know who your fans are and some of them are much cool me.. rest assured much cooler than I am. Um I had wound up I went up in Janet Jackson’s mansion one time in Miami beach because she like summoned us to the mansion.

Joe Rogan

Summoned, how she do that did she have a horn?

{Joe makes horn noise and both start laughing}

Billy Corben

Yes like it’s a shofar really and so we got a call from uh an agent who was a mutual friend, and he said Janet is in town. She’s renting a mansion on La Gorce Island.

Joe Rogan

God that’s wild!

Billy Corben

La Gorce Island is where Sal Magluta from cocaine cowboys: the kings of Miami rented a mansion as well. So that’s how I knew La Gorce I’m like fu**ing Sal Magluta’s mansion, rental mansion. So she says she’s here recording an album, she wants to meet you, she’s a huge fan. And I was like, she…

Joe Rogan

Did she think you were the guy from The Smashing Pumpkins?

Billy Corben

Yeah I was like who does she…

Joe Rogan

{Laughs} did she?

 Billy Corben

Yeah I’m the one with the hair does she know that. I’m like not Billy Corben. And who incidentally has @billy on Twitter. Was he like a fu**ing investor in Twitter like, how did he got @billy?

Joe Rogan

I don’t know Billy’s smart

 Billy Corben

So what happens is when people go want to want to tweet at him they go @billy c-o-r and my name I guess like autofill’s because they go right past @billy which he has @billy and so I get all kinds of… like when they’re like upset at how he treated daisy on wrestling on Sunday like what the f**k is going on like you’re so mean to daisy I’m like what the f**k is happening, like why who do you think I am! But like um, but like uh we get so Janet wants to meet you and so we come to this mansion, we’re sitting with her manager at the time was this great big hilarious dude and we’re just chilling on the couch and all of a sudden he looks up and all of a sudden at the top of the stairway a vision, Janet Jackson she’s like in this beautiful moo moo was like I don’t know it was just like seeing like a like Nefertiti like like fu**ing…

 Joe Rogan

Royalty.

 Billy Corben

Like Cleopatra at that, we’re all just like uh there’s like you know the angels are singing and she’s beautiful and so like and she like descends the staircase you know and we’re just like this is incredible. And she sits down and she is just like the sweetest like, most casual, down-to-earth person and she goes into this story she’s like, one morning my phone rings, it’s like 4 o’clock in the morning and it’s Jermaine Dupri – not Jackson her brother she was dating Jermaine Dupri at the time. And she said and she said baby is everything okay? He says yes, I’m coming over right now there’s something you need to see. And she goes okay it’s 4 o’clock in the morning. Shows up at the door, are you sure everything’s okay? Yes everything’s fine baby you’ve got to watch this! And he hands me a DVD-r written in sharpe it says Cocaine Cowboys.  

Joe Rogan

{Laughs}

Billy Corben

And I’m like I’m like I’m like I’m with their my producing partner Alfred Spellman I’m just like what the f**k is happening right now? What the f**k is happening? And she said and I watched it twice. She put the dvd, the bootleg into the dvd player at 4 o’clock in the morning and she watched Cocaine Cowboy’s twice. And she’s like you know, when we were growing up my sister, she was interested in love story and romance and I was like she’s talking about LaToya right now, like we know too much about this family right you know so like she’s like she’s like she goes I loved you know Mafia stories, crime stories, Scarface, crime incorporated, Al Capone that was my thing and so I loved it. And she wanted to talk about Griselda Blanco, the godmother and I’m like this is bat sh*t crazy so she says do you guys like Sushi? Alfred hated Sushi. He says YEAH I like Sushi!

 Joe Rogan

{Laughs Hysterically}

 Billy Corben

She says we should go to Nobu and have Sushi next week. He’s like yeah absolutely love Sushi! And we went out with Janet Jackson to Nobu and she’s like, and we shared.. it was it was surreal.

The End

Taken from: JRE #1706 w/Billy Corben

Categories
Scripts

Bret Weinstein On The Proliferation of COVID Variants

PowerfulJRE SCRIPT

Bret Weinstein

Garrett Vandenbosch said this is going to become a pandemic of variants – and he talked about immune escape. And that has been very controversial but…

Joe Rogan

Did you explain that to people?

Bret Weinstein

Sure, what he argued and let’s just say…

Joe Rogan

Could you explain who he is too?

Bret Weinstein

Sure, he is a uh immunobiologist, he is training his veterinary um, he has training in the relevant area of vaccination technology. He was a guest on dark horse people can look up my discussion with him. It is um many people regard it as a very good way to understand what he’s saying because often he speaks about matters that are quite technical and anyway I did my best in that podcast to make it non-technical so that people could understand it. In any case what he argued was that the fact of these vaccines being very narrowly targeted right, these vaccines contain a single sub-unit of a single protein. And they’re being deployed in a way that is unusual, they’re being deployed into an active pandemic right. When we immunize against something like measles the expectation is you will develop your full immunity with almost no chance of encountering measles, right. In this cast what we have are vaccines that are leaky in which they do not provide full sterilizing immunity, they are narrow and um we are effectively creating an intense evolutionary pressure to cause the spike protein of which this one sub-unit is what is contained the information for it is contained in the vaccines. We are putting intense evolutionary pressure on it to change so that the antibodies and other immune cell recognition mechanisms that are trained by the vaccines are incapable of finding the pathogen when it gets in. This is what causes breakthrough cases that the immunity that’s been created is evaded by the pathogen and if the pathogen changes um that is more likely. And so what he said was if you vaccinated into an active pandemic with vaccines like this, what you will get is a evolutionary pressure for a radiation of variants, an evolutionary radiation of uh different molecular signatures changes in the spike protein that will then cause the vaccines to be less and less effective at producing immunity – which is exactly what we see.

Joe Rogan

So he predicted this?

Bret Weinstein

Absolutely! He did predict it.

Joe Rogan

Accurately!

 Bret Weinstein

Accurate, accurately predicted it. Now is every component of his model correct? That’s a much harder question to answer. But what I would say is any time somebody succeeds in predicting better than the so-called experts, you wanna know how they did it and he was making absolute evolutionary sense right. His concerns were very well honed and he was making sense and then the world that he predicted, emerged. And it is now incumbent on us to say okay, have we learned anything from this, right. Do the vaccines need to be modified, such that they don’t produce this affect. There are conceivable ways you can do that right. But if we don’t do it if we just say well more of the same, have a booster of the same thing it’s not going to solve the problem. So in effect what I would say is these vaccines are a spectacular achievement but they are a prototype, right. They have achieved something that had never been done before, technologically that’s remarkable, but they were not ready for prime time and they have failed to produce lasting immunity, they have produced very narrow immunity, it does not compare to the natural immunity that people get from having had and beaten the disease and what’s more we have learned an awful lot about how the disease can be managed so it’s much less lethal, right. That combination suggests that we need a rethinking of our approach and you know, it is impossible to prove. But based on what people who have successfully treated the disease and have successfully predicted events like the proliferation of variants are telling us, it does seem that we now have the tools at our disposal to manage this crisis and do away with it. Which I don’t know why we don’t do that, but it is at least worth noting that were we to successfully manage it, it would interrupt a huge flow of revenue into this brand new pharma market. Is that the reason that we don’t do it? I don’t know. But, we the public need to recognize our interests are not being served by the public health apparatus. It is making errors that it doesn’t need to make, and that that has implications for all of our individual health and our collective well-being that uh require a re-think.

The End

Taken from JRE #1705 w/Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying

Categories
Scripts

Dr. Rhonda Patrick on Vaccine Misinformation and Covid Script

PowerfulJRE Script

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

But you know since we’re on this topic can we talk a little bit of vaccines…

Joe Rogan

Yes.

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Because I’m, it’s something I have seen a lot of misinformation like, on, everywhere. {chuckles} Facebook, on you know different media outlets and I think there’s really like some, some main ones that I just feel are causing harm. And so um there’s really 8 of them we don’t need to talk about all of them but I think the eight really are that you know, sars cov two is not that bad, Covid-19 is not that bad. And you know vaccines basically don’t prevent transmission. Spike protein from vaccines are cytotoxic, therefore they’re really bad um that vaccines are gonna cause something called antibody dependent enhancement which is gonna make you have a more severe disease. There’s the, vaccines are going to cause infertility, there’s the um vaccines are going to cause a more violent, virulent strain or variant. And then there’s one more that um, oh yeah that alternatives to vaccines exist right now that are just as good. And I think that.. there’s a few of those that are really I mean just like blatantly, they’re wrong! All of them I think there but I mean you know there’s some that are more important than others and I think that I would like to talk about them, um you know I think first and foremost the… there’s like 2 groups of people, one take thinks covid-19’s bad, doesn’t want it, wants the vaccine. And the other one that thinks it’s not that bad and uh that the vaccines may be harmful. And there’s also…

Joe Rogan

Do you think that vaccines are harmful to anyone?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Well, of course. I mean…

Joe Rogan

Do you know anyone that’s had bad reactions to vaccine’s?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I personally, interestingly the only, I know a lot of people that have gotten vaccinated and the only person that I know that had something was like, she had a headache for like a week and a half and then it went away. Um, oh no another person I knew had like nausea for like a couple of weeks they were like nauseous more more frequently but it went away. Um you know…

Joe Rogan

Do you think you would feel differently if you knew someone that had a stroke? Or someone who’s had heart attacks – perhaps young people that have?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Well, it’s hard to say so you know I do, people react differently obviously when you’re giving you know 100 and more than 169 million people are vaccinated right, I mean that’s half our adult population is is vaccinated – fully vaccinated with Covid-19. And um, it’s not zero risk people are some people are going to have an adverse reaction and they do, it’s a big world out there you know like if you were to give 169 million people a peanut or a shellfish like some people are going to have very adverse reactions some people are going to die like it’s a big world. But you know with the stroke or the heart attack you know you have to like like so if you’re trying to compare for example let’s say you know you’re looking at actual covid-19 deaths and from heart attacks and strokes and you’re looking at the vaccine adverse events reporting site there’s right and that as well. You know, you have to realize that basically in the United States like in 2017 there was a publication in the journal of circulation, someone dies from cardiovascular disease every 30 seconds in the United States. Like every 30 seconds, most of those people are above the age of 50 and certainly most are above 65. But every 30 seconds someone is dying from cardiovascular disease, every 40 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke, every four minutes they die from a stroke.

Joe Rogan

But this is also very very rare in young people, particularly young healthy people. But one thing that has occurred in young, healthy people that have been vaccinated is myocarditis and some people have had blood clots, like quite a few blood clots and there’s speculation right the salk institute released that paper about the uh spike protein causing uh some sort of deterioration of the blood vessels did you read that? (4:11)

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I looked at the spike, I’ve been looking at a lot of the um spike and…

 Joe Rogan

That’s from Covid-19 they’re discussing it

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

They’re talking about from yeah.

Joe Rogan

From the actual disease itself.

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Yes so um you know first of all like they’re, you have to like there’s you’re either going to get infected with Covid 19 – most people are going to be eventually we’re all going to be exposed to it. So you’re either going to be vaccinated when you’re exposed to it or not. And people are dying from heart attacks and blood clots and even people are getting myocarditis like 100 full times more than vaccines. Like the myocarditis link from the mrna, specifically the mrna vaccines, is real and I think the last I saw it was like 50 per million which is still rare and it’s…

Joe Rogan

It’s happened to two people that I know.

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

It it so up until then and actually now that you asked me um I forgot I had a um, someone who’s a supporter um, I talked about vaccines in one of my Q&A’s I do and they went and got it and they were younger and ended up having some kind of myocarditis – so I do know someone that had it. I don’t know them but they emailed me.

Joe Rogan

What happens if you have that and like how do you recover from that?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

But you realize it’s happening to young people so myocarditis is caused by two things. One by inflammation, two by direct viral infection and it’s more common in adolescents and young people.

Joe Rogan

And it’s an enlargement of the heart.

 Dr Rhonda Patrick

It’s inflammation of the heart can lead to that yeah. But it’s it’s happening in young athletes with covid-19 like and it’s happening more frequently than people that are getting vaccinated. So it’s still like well if the person that got vaccinated, look it is a risk but it’s still pretty rare and it also is treatable in most cases they treat it like within a few days – and it’s isolated.

Joe Rogan

Why do you think that people like there are people that are completely asymptomatic when they get covid or if they did get it it’s very mild. Do you think that’s because they have a lower viral load that they’ve been infected with or do you think it’s their immune system that fights it off like, what do you think is happening?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

It could be any and all of those things I mean a combination of them and you know, but so like even if you think you know if you’re looking at just like the most extreme part of like the deaths right you know you’ve got like over 624000 deaths in Covid-19. Most of those deaths are happening in people over the age of 50, um and if you look at like…

Joe Rogan

Most of them have four plus comorbidity factors right isn’t that the average?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I don’t know if it’s four plus for average, I think the comorbidities increase yeah.

Joe Rogan

Let’s find out what the number of comorbidities are in terms of like uh th deaths. It used to be 2.6 but I think they raised them to four.

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Really, the number of them four okay.

Joe Rogan

I think so. I might be wrong but I know it was at least two points…

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Right so then there’s the argument “well I’m healthy, I don’t have comorbidities” right. I mean so, so what should I do like should I you know get vaccinated or or should I be exposed to the virus. And I think there’s a lot of evidence and there’s multiple lines of evidence, one you know, there are people with mild symptoms that are getting post-acute covid syndrome, they’re getting this what people call it long-haul covid. And a lot and the majority of people…  

Joe Rogan

What do you think that is, what is post what is long-haul covid?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I don’t know what it is I think it depends on the symptoms I think there could be a variety of causes for it. Um so you know there are people and most of it is happening in teenagers to like 50. Most of the people that are older are not getting this long-haul covid it’s like happening in people that are mostly not being hospitalized. People that don’t get hospitalized originally like they have mostly like pretty mild symptoms – in some cases even asymptomatic. You know there was a study published in the um The Lancet like last year showing there was a seven-fold increase in stroke incidents in people under 50 in the United States – compared to the year before that before the pandemic started.

Joe Rogan

And that is probably because the spike protein that causes this deterioration of the blood vessels and blood clots is that what it is from the from the virus?

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Well I don’t know what it is I mean there’s lots of things you know, viral infections themselves can cause hyper coagulation and they can cause blood clots like just like that’s like known from other viruses like that’s something, there’s inflammation.

Joe Rogan

Without the spike protein.

 Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Without the spike protein. So let’s okay, I feel like I haven’t got to address everything but let’s talk about the …

Young Jamie

Real quick, I think this forum points out where I would find this information I hope, that’s the spot

 Joe Rogan

Yeah there is an average of 4.0 additional conditions or causes of death for data on deaths involving covid-19 by time, period. Jurisdiction and other health conditions.

Young Jamie

This is only 5% the covid was the only cause and then…

 Joe Rogan

So for only 5% of the covid deaths covid-19 was the only cause mentioned so out of those 600,000 people that died only 5% died just from covid-19.

Dr. Rhonda patrick

Well I mean so you have people that are, covid-19’s going to make their comorbidities worse and and that could be the same for a vaccine it could be the same for anything right I mean so like something that’s going to activate the immune system…

 Joe Rogan

Yeah but I’ve the the concern is with what vaccines the negative effects of what people are worried about I think is young people that are healthy, that have negative effects. Like that have had strokes, or that have had thrombosis or myocarditis and those issues right.

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Well I think you know again, if you look at the data you know young people are also experiencing those things at a higher rate and are those all the people with the co-morbidities? Like I don’t know you know like I’m not sure. But it seems as though no matter which way you look at it like it it’s it is worse to be exposed to that virus and like how do you know that person that had that myocarditis wouldn’t have had it x-fold worse with the with the covid-19. Because it’s been shown to happen in young healthy athletes you know and people are…

 Joe Rogan

Has it been shown in large numbers like the athletes…

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

More more so more so…

 Joe Rogan

More so than the vaccines that we were saying?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Yes I’m saying that it’s happening myocarditis is from the vaccines it’s happening in younger people at a higher rate than from the vaccines.

 Joe Rogan

Do we have accurate data do you think about how many myocarditis instances we have from the vaccine?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Well you could argue there’s an under reporting um I think people, so anyone can submit data to the VAERS and I think when it comes to someone who’s younger um they’re more likely I mean so healthcare professionals have to submit to the VAERS if there’s like something that’s life-threatening some which myocarditis could be, or if it’s death or something that’s like you know, changes their daily function like congenital effects…

 Joe Rogan

They have to submit it?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Yes! They are, if they are…

 Joe Rogan

But if uh do they how do they know that myocarditis is caused by the vaccine?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

It they don’t but if it if the person had gotten vaccinated and by the way there’s no time constraint like it’s not like oh if they’ve only been you know vaccinated within like in 2 months like they’re supposed to they’re supposed to submit to VAERS like if someone was vaccinated and then something…

 Joe Rogan

They’re supposed to?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Yes.

 Joe Rogan

Is there encouragement or discouragement to submit to VAERS?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I don’t know I don’t know but I mean you know if you again even just looking at the deaths in every age group even, like you know people that are in my age group 40 to 49 you know there’s 20,000 deaths that have been linked to the confirmed covid-19 cases. Whereas you know variants it’s 200 and even if you triple that…

 Joe Rogan

For people with comorbidities obviously it’s a real issue.

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Yeah I don’t know if that’s if that’s always the case but yes definitely with people with comorbidities.

 Joe Rogan

Because according to this what we pulled up it’s 5% that are dying just of the covid, 95% have an average of four comorbidities.

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Okay well if that’s true for all ages um then you know yes people with comorbidities are more likely to die. But also younger people like I said they’re more likely to get you know these long-haul symptoms where I’ve known so many people you know that they’re they’ve gotten like their loss of smell or taste has been like several months. And there’s now studies showing that you know if you, there was a huge study out of the biobank um UK biobank data where the where right before the pandemic started MRI’s were done, brain scans on line almost a thousand people it was like over 800. And then the pandemic hit, people got covid some people didn’t whatever. So they brought these these the same cohort of people back in for a brain scan and you know basically they corrected four people so they had people that they compared people that were the same age, same gender, same sex. And then they um also timed between scans and they found that both mild and severe covid-19 cases caused a atrophy in the gray matter region of the brain. It was worse in people that had it more severe, understandable right, but people that had mild cases that didn’t go to the hospital had it!

 Joe Rogan

How many people did they study with this?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

It was over 800 yea I mean you know it’s, you need more data to confirm but I mean…

 Joe Rogan

Were these people, did they stratify it by age did they have it by health?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Age, gender, ethnicity, health I don’t know.

 Joe Rogan

Did they have comorbidities, did they factor that in?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

They had people that age the same age you know as the people didn’t get covid and they didn’t have it I mean you know this several months, this is just months after – I don’t know about the health.

 Joe Rogan

Did they monitor the nutrition or find out what kind of supplements they were on?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I don’t know, I don’t know if any of that data was was you know in it but…

 Joe Rogan

Do you think that data would be a factor at all?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

I don’t know because I know people that supplement, that exercise, that have had um were diagnosed with they had a mild case and they were diagnosed with pots. You know, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, where there heart was racing like tachycardia was racing like just can’t control like uncontrollably. They were dizzy, had no energy I mean this was months and they finally got diagnosed there’s like a lot of people coming out with this but you know…

 Joe Rogan

Do you know anybody that had covid and got through it with almost no symptoms at all and was very mild?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Um, well yeah no symptoms at all but the people that I do know most of them had some kind of weird taste issue like or smell thing for like weeks and weeks but um but yeah…

 Joe Rogan

Do you know anybody that didn’t have that?

Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Um, I don’t because most the people I that had it lost their smell.

The End

Taken from JRE #1701 w/Dr. Rhonda Patrick

Categories
Scripts

Neill Blomkamp’s Unmade Alien Movie Script

PowerfulJRE Script

Neill Blomkamp

What are other Sci-fi favorites of yours?

Joe Rogan

Alien.

Neill Blomkamp

Alien yeah.

Joe Rogan

That’s why I was really excited when I heard that you were, at least potentially, at one point in time thinking about doing an Alien.

Neill Blomkamp

Yeah, it would have been cool.

Joe Rogan

What happened?

Neill Blomkamp

It’s just you know just studio politics and the um, I do I do think that the way Chappie was received probably played a role in me not working on Alien. Uh but, you know its Ridley’s world that he created and it’s like it should be his to do what he wants with so it’s all good.

Joe Rogan

Yeah I get that but still would have been fun.

 Neill Blomkamp

Yeah it would have been fun for me as well I mean, the thing that I would have really enjoyed about it was Sigourney Weaver was really down for what I had written and she… the main thing to me was, even though I like Alien 3 and I love Fincher as a director, I just wanted a version of the continuation of what happened after Aliens. And for Newt to be alive and for you, for Ripley to continue that story um and it was sort of based on that idea.

Joe Rogan

Is the kid who played Newt, how old is she now?

 Neill Blomkamp

Um I mean in my story she was in her uh mid 20’s um, I mean in reality Alien’s just turned 35 so she must be you know, like 44 or something.

 Joe Rogan

Isn’t that wild.

Neill Blomkamp

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

It’s wild when you find out that the move, the original was from the 70’s.

 Neill Blomkamp

79 yeah.

 Joe Rogan

Yeah like what!

 Neill Blomkamp

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

It seems so much more current than a 1970’s movie.

Neill Blomkamp

Yeah I mean that’s one of the thing that’s amazing about it is is how timeless it is.

 Joe Rogan

Yeah.

 Neill Blomkamp

You know, and also just, I mean a lot of it I saw it in a theater a couple of ago and I couldn’t believe just the quality of everything, it’s really amazing how well it was filmed.

Joe Rogan

I accidentally watched the Blu-ray version of Alien and it’s kind of hilarious. Because in the Blu-ray version things that were not meant to be HD are now HD. So there’s a scene where the spaceships are lined up and there’s clearly a mural of spaceships in the background, it looks so fu**ing fake!

Neill Blomkamp

Oh you mean a matte painting…

 Joe Rogan

Yeess.

 Neill Blomkamp

Is it when they’re in the Solaco when they’re in the, when they’re in the military shop, the big one?

Joe Rogan

Yes.

 Neill Blomkamp

Right, I think I know what you mean.

Joe Rogan

It looks so corny I’m like nooo {chuckles} because there’s you know, there’s like this physical ship and then behind it it’s just some bullsh*t. It’s like it’s’ so clear that they used, you know they expected like focus and you know the graininess of film to mask that.

 Neill Blomkamp

Yeah matte paintings pre-computer graphics were done on panes of glass. And so um I mean in a way Aliens is like using the technology that they had at the time is actually like totally incredible, but I do know what you’re saying though. I mean for audiences now weaned on the stuff that we’re we have access to, you know these techniques are so outdated but it would be a large pane of glass like a shower piece of glass then they would paint what they want the set to look like.

Joe Rogan

Ahh.

Neill Blomkamp

And shoot through it with your other real environment as well. That’s why the shot’s always locked off right, they’re always stable, obviously you can’t move so yeah.

 Joe Rogan

Right. Aliens was interesting by itself if alien didn’t exist. The problem with Aliens is these creatures are so bumbling and easy to kill. Like in the first movie that thing was so clever.

Neill Blomkamp

Pure terror.

 Joe Rogan

Yeah pure terror, so clever and and so good at sneaking up on people.

Neill Blomkamp

I think the thing that Cameron did with the second film was pretty amazing though in the way that he was, he made it militaristic, it changed the the context. And so I think because of that.. and also there was the kind of Vietnam war high technology, low technology sort of parable at play.

 Joe Rogan

Yes.

Neill Blomkamp

Um, so it was two forces you know in which case it makes the aliens be more, there’s an abundance of them.

 Joe Rogan

Right.

Neill Blomkamp

Um but I almost like both films equally I think. Both both approaches.

The End

Taken from JRE #1698 w/Neill Blomkamp

Categories
Scripts

Joe Rogan – Afghanistan And US Intervention Policies Script

PowerfulJRE Script

Zuby

The Taliban have taken over Afghanistan…

Joe Rogan

That’s a creepy one huh

Zuby

That looks weird um

Joe Rogan

Did you see the people falling from the plane?

Zuby

I did.

Joe Rogan

That’s wild.

Zuby

It’s it’s weird..

Joe Rogan

Rushing the plane tryna get on board, tryna get rescued and taken out of the country, f**k.

Zuby

It’s so odd you know, I was having a conversation with um with friends just yesterday and I was saying, I literally had forgotten like, I was like why why was the US in Afghanistan again? It had been so long I was literally trying to remember what the initial reason for going in there was.

Joe Rogan

Yeah.

 Zuby

But I mean I’m no foreign policy expert, I’m not going to pretend to be but it seems very obvious that the way they withdrew was crazy, and leaving all the weapons and ammunition and vehicles and stuff like that for the Taliban to just come and scoop up.

 Joe Rogan

If one was a legit conspiracy theorist, like a real tin foil hatter, you would look at this and go this is probably the best way to ensure the support of a re-invasion. Like, leave a bunch of weapons behind, make the whole thing disastrous, have the Taliban take over the entire country in a short period of time, start executing women mayor’s, do all the crazy sh*t they’re probably gonna do and then you know have some real public outcry.

 Zuby

So weird, people are con… I still get people who are confused as to why I do not generally trust the government and I don’t know how many examples I need to {chuckles} pull out from recent times and from further history to just be like look, whether this is malice or it’s incompetence or um, with some things it doesn’t matter, all right. Whether it’s malice or incompetence…

Joe Rogan

It seems more like incompetence than anything.

Zuby

But how can.. with certain things I’m like how can it be. Like it’s so obvious right? It’s so obvious what is going to happen in a certain situation and then you do it anyway – and I don’t, I don’t understand that. One person could be incompetent but it’s like it’s not just one person who makes all these ideas. They’ve got actual people who are supposed to be experts and advisors etc. I mean you even had people in the media last month, and the media is pretty friendly towards Joe Biden here for the most part. And people in the media are saying Hey if you do this aren’t the Taliban gonna just take over everything.

Joe Rogan

He’s like ‘no’.

Zuby

He’s like no.

Joe Rogan

No, {Biden impression}‘there’s like 300,000 Afghanistan armed soldiers and only 75000 taliban’. Meanwhile they took it over and they just did it.

  Zuby

Yeah, yeah.

Joe Rogan

I mean there was no gunshots fired it’s…

Zuby

No.

  Joe Rogan

I just, I just think the whole thing is just a disaster. the whole this nation-building thing is a disaster and Afghanistan itself has never been a traditional country in the sense of like a central leadership. It’s like it’s basically for most of history it’s been run by warlords. It’s like warlord’s that controlled regions.

Zuby                          

Here’s a question Joe. This is something I wonder about a lot. Both on an individual level and on, and on a nation level, how much and at what point should say a country get involved with the affairs of another one?

Joe Rogan

It’s a good question. Well it should be probably, at a, we should have levels of atrocity that are intolerable. Right, where it’s like Nazi Germany type levels. But if that’s the case why are we not invading North Korea? Because North Korea, you talk with Yeonmi Park or any of the people that have escaped from North Korea, it’s essentially a form of holocaust. There’s people that are in concentration camps, they’ve live their whole lives there, their children will be born there, there’s people that are starving to death, there’s people that are cannibalizing people – it’s a weird fu**ed up, horrific situation over there. And uh there’s no, there’s no plan to do anything about it.

Zuby  

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

But yet, we keep talking about doing things in the middle east and there’s a lot of resources in the middle east that may or may not be a motive to being there. One of them is drugs. It’s uh up until the invasion of Afghanistan, I mean I’m not sure what the number is now, but Afghanistan.. once we invaded I think they were the supplier of 94% of the world’s opium.

Zuby

Oh I didn’t know that.

Joe Rogan

Oh yeah.

Zuby

I didn’t know that.

Joe Rogan

Well the fu**ing United States troops were guarding poppy fields because these people that were there, that was their main way of making a living. And the US troops were guarding the poppy fields. It’s fu**ing crazy! Let’s find out what the actual number is as of today, but I believe that.. I think that was the number at one point in time that 94% of the world’s opium supply was from Afghanistan.

Zuby

Afghanistan specifically, wow.

Joe Rogan

There’s also a massive supply of uh minerals, of conflict minerals ironically. {Joe reads an article} ‘In 2014 the estimated opium production was 6400’ what is an MT? Uh yeah ‘In 2017 production climbed to a new record of 9000 MT’ buh buh buh buh buuh ‘result of a drought. These levels of production are enough to supply most of the world’s opiate markets.’

Young Jamie

Wow. This is a study from the Brookings, Brookings.edu…

Joe Rogan

Oh metric tons that’s what it is. Okay, 2007 Afghan opium production climbed to what was then seen as a staggering 8200 metric tons. Uh interesting. In 2018 climbed to a new record of uh 9000 metric tons then falling to, in 2018 6400 metric tons. Massive amounts of opium.

Zuby

Wow.

Joe Rogan

Yeah. This is what’s crazy, um the the uh trafficking okay oh, here it is. It is estimated that the gross value of the Afghan opium economy, including the cultivation of poppy processing into heroin and trafficking up to Afghan borders, to be between US 4.1 billion and 6.6 billion in 2017… wow.

Zuby

It’s so funny seeing those numbers there compared to like these trillions and trillions that they just keep, keep printing sounds like nothing. I don’t even know how these numbers are just, you get to a stage where you can’t fathom.

Joe Rogan

I mean, it’s just like too many zeros. It’s also like where is that money going. Like if that’s, if they’re making that much money selling heroin where’s it going, who’s getting it? Who’s selling it? Where’s it going? How’s it getting out the country? Are you guys watching it? Watch the fields… keep an eye on it {laughs}.

Zuby

I have no idea man. The world is such a weird place and always has been. I did listen to the that podcast you did with um Yeonmi Park which was amazing, amazing by the way. Um and…

Joe Rogan

Yeah it was wild.

Zuby

North Korea is.. it blows my mind that here in 2021 with everything you know we’re doing and whatever that there’s just one country out there that we know like, almost nothing about it’s just black out, totally disconnected from the world, virtually everyone no one’s met anyone from there, virtually no one’s been there. Even if you’ve been there you can only go on like a guided tour to like one small part of it. It amazes me that that’s a thing I always just think like how is that possible – given how interconnected we all are.

Joe Rogan

And she was saying that if it wasn’t for China’s support they wouldn’t be able to survive a week.

Zuby

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

They’d be like.. China, they need China’s support. And that’s the reason China props them up.

Zuby  

It’s so weird. How do you think that um, how do you think that will come to an end?

Joe Rogan

It might not. It might go on for hundreds of years.

Zuby

I think it will, I think evil always falls eventually.

Joe Rogan

It does eventually but what is eventually if a human lifetime is you know, if 100 years if you’re lucky. There’s been many evil regimes that have lasted longer than that. So I mean many many many generations of people are going to suffer.

Zuby

Yeah it’s so odd. I don’t know, the world…

Joe Rogan

They can’t do anything about it, the thing is like they’re starving, they have no access to weapons, the government has full complete control over them and when you pass the borders they have land mines set up. So if you’re making a run for it you’re gonna fu**ing blow up.

Zuby

And what’s do you know what what’s China’s interest with keeping or allowing it to stay that way is there some benefit to them.

Joe Rogan

That’s a good question.

Zuby

Because I know that they’re propped up by China but why would China want you know, why would they want it to stay like that I don’t really understand that?

Joe Rogan

Well they probably enjoy the fact that there’s a conflict between North and South Korea as they’re both close to each other – and South Korea’s allies with the United States. You know, China has their fu**ing tentacles and so many different things man it’s wild.

Young Jamie

I got some more numbers here for you to help with the Afghan thing.

Joe Rogan

Yeah.

Young Jamie

This is from Wiki but they’re like from the Afghan papers I think where a lot of this information came from.

Joe Rogan

{Reads from article} ‘As of 2017 opium production provides about 400,000 jobs in Afghanistan, more than the Afghan national security forces the opium trade spiked in 2006 after the Taliban lost control of the local warlords.’

Young Jamie

93%. 

Joe Rogan

93% of the non-pharmaceutical grade opiates of the world market originated in Afghanistan.

Young Jamie

More land is used in Afghanistan to grow for opium than cocoa cultivation in all of Latin America

Zuby

Wow. I did not know this, I never linked Afghanistan with huge amounts of opium.

Joe Rogan

Yeah man, it’s in a Sturgill Simpson song. That’s I mean we are, we’re repeating what happened in the Vietnam war right. In the Vietnam war that was a big part of what the Vietnam war was all about was the heroin trade. So that’s what’s going on here man.

Zuby

Yeah.

Joe Rogan

It’s like, it’s gotta be a factor. This idea that it’s not a factor of why we’re there and that some fu**ing scum bad is not profiting off of this, for sure it is. There’s no way they’re not I mean if these are the same people that paid Barry Seals to run coke over from south America and drop it into Mena, Arkansas, you don’t think that they would be making money over in Afghanistan.

Zuby

No I do man, I believe that every government is corrupt.

Joe Rogan

They’re gonna make a documentary about the, the poppies they’re gonna have to. Someone, now that we’re out of Afghanistan someone’s going to make a documentary about the heroin trade and people are going to fu**ing blow their wig off, they’re going to be like ‘WHAT’!

The End

Categories
Scripts

Joe Rogan On Briefly Meeting Trump At The UFC Script

PowerfulJRE Script

Joe Rogan

The, the and the other thing is like you’re gonna become a conservative well then, well then okay now you’re tribal. Can’t you just be someone who’s politically homeless. Like why do you have to be on this other side now. Now you have to like you know say ‘I’m a god-fearing Christian and Donald Trump was brought here by Jesus. I met trump this past weekend.

Jesse Singal

Where?

Joe Rogan

He has regular sized hands by the way.

Jesse Singal

They’re not tiny?

Joe Rogan

The media, they’re full of s**t.

Jesse Singal

You sure he wasn’t wearing fake hands?

Joe Rogan

He might have been wearing fake hands he’s a clever fella.

Jesse Singal

Very slapstick.

 Joe Rogan

Yeah, put on his fake hands.

Jesse Singal

Where’d you meet him?

 Joe Rogan

At the UFC.

 Jesse Singal

What was he like?

 Joe Rogan

He came over to me when I was working I had my headphones on and uh I said hey how you doing man, nice to meet you, shook his hand and uh got a video of it it’s kind of hilarious. Uh he’s like you do tremendous job, amazing job, good job. Then he said to Daniel Cormier who was next to me who was a former light heavyweight champion and the former heavyweight champion he goes ‘I do not wanna fight this guy, I do not wanna fight this guy’.

{Joe Laughs}

I should’ve got a selfie with him, F**K!

Jesse Singal

Yeah you should have, missed opportunity.

 Joe Rogan

What are you gonna do. It was weird, it was very weird. When he walked in though I’m telling you man they cheered the f**k out of him.

Jesse Singal

Oh yeah he’s like a fu**ing uhm… some dead-enders who really want to see him be president again one way or another.

The End